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In

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Meetings and Events Magazine

Ed. 19 - Santiago de Compostela

Tourist Office of Spain

Why Santiago de Compostela?

El Camino de Santiago

Organizing your event

Leisure activities for your event in Santiago de Compostela

Plan your trip to Santiago

Agenda

Ed.19 Santiago de Compostela - December 2016\n

Introduction

Welcome to Santiago de Compostela,\n

declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to its beautiful and exceptionally well preserved monuments as well as its status as the final destination of an ancient pilgrimage route: the Way of St James, or Camino de Santiago. It is a Holy City, the capital of the region of Galicia, and a European City of Culture for 2000, but it remains a friendly, charming and warm city due to its small size, safe streets and the relaxed pace of everyday life.
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Why Santiago de Compostela?

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Camino de Santiago

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Organizing your event

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Leisure activities for your event in Santiago de Compostela

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Plan your trip to Santiago

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Agenda

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Fast Facts

Whether you are a pilgrim arriving exhausted, or Santiago de Compostela is chosen as the venue of a professional events: everybody ends up immersed in the permanent celebration that is the city’s life. Santiago takes care of its visitors by means of a network of hotels with more than 15,000 beds, 5,000 seats available in specialized infrastructures designed for meetings and congresses - and a gastronomic range capable of satisfying those with a discerning palate and all kinds of budgets. No wonder that for more than a thousand years, Santiago has been a land of universal reception, a meeting place born for the daily exercising of hospitality.
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Capital of Galicia

Santiago de Compostela is the capital of Galicia, the seat of the regional government, and the core of its social and political life.
 
Photo: Turismo de Santiago
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Historical Community

A historical community with a blossoming culture, it hosts a 500-year-old university.

Photo: Turismo de Santiago\n

Languages

Spanish and Galician are both spoken in this bilingual city.\n

The tomb of St. James the Apostle

Santiago’s origins date back to the year 813, when the tomb of St. James the Apostle was discovered there. According to legend, an anchorite was led to the tomb by a vision of a field of stars, Campus Stellae in Latin, which is where the present name of Compostela derives from.

Photo: Turismo de Santiago\n

The Cathedral

The city’s first basilica was built in the ninth century, and the cathedral we see today is a balanced compendium of its original Romanesque style together with Gothic, Renaissance, baroque and neoclassical elements.

Photo: Turismo de Santiago\n

Gastronomy

As for gastronomy, Santiago is renowned for its use of prime produce. Traditional Galician dishes include octopus and other seafood, savory pies, Padrón peppers, soft cheeses and more. A Galician wine makes a perfect accompaniment, and no experience is complete without a taste of Queimada, Galicia’s fiery traditional punch.\n

Madrid: Handmade fans

The fan is one of the most famous folklore products of Spain, found in classic cinema, literature, fiestas, and in flamenco. In Madrid, countless workshops are still devoted to making fans in a wide variety of colors and materials. Known throughout the world for their craftsmanship, these fans are not merely used for keeping cool in the long Spanish summer but are also true miniature works of art.
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Toledo: Damasquinada

The steel of Toledo has long been the stuff of legend. In particular, this Medieval city is famed for its artisanal crafts and, above all, its swords and its damascene craftworks. Originally brought to Spain from Damascus, damascene craftsmen perfected the art of decorating steel with intricate threads of silver and gold. Several workshops in the historic city still preserve the traditional process, with shops selling damascene handicrafts. 
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Photo: Renata Sedmakova / Shutterstock.com\n

Valencia: Manises ceramics

For centuries, the town of Manises has been synonymous with ceramics.  Indeed, the history of the ceramics industry and the history of the town itself have been interwoven since the fourteenth century, and continue to be so to this day. Local specialties include exquisite painted tiles and patterned plates.
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Mallorca: Espadrilles

In the Raiguer region, famed for its leather and footwear handicrafts, you can find some of the oldest shoemaker studios in Mallorca. The combination of excellent materials and the unique production process mean espadrilles from Mallorca consistently enjoy success at some of the most prestigious international craft fairs worldwide.
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Sevilla: Ceramics and tiles

Seville is characterized by its handcrafted pottery and ceramics. The first works are dated from the Neolithic age, although it was during the Muslim Period that they started to acquire their own unique personality. Most workshops are located in the historic Triana neighborhood, where you can wander the streets and see examples of craftsmanship in walls, tiled floors and roofs. Later, artisans adopted eastern techniques and mixed this with local traditions, evident in mosaics and hand-painted tiles.
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Córdoba: Leather

In the historic city center of Cordoba you can see ceramics, Caliphate silverware, textile prints, jewelry and, of course, leather goods. Leather is the raw material used in making the famous Cordobanes and Guadamecies, which are pieces of leather embossed, modelled and coloured with modern or classical designs. Nowadays only a few family-run workshops keep this traditional handicraft alive.
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Granada: Handmade guitars

Spain was the birthplace of the modern six-string guitar, though it was based upon a similar  stringed instrument of the Islamic world. The guitar is the versatile accompaniment of choice in the art of flamenco, and Granada is Spain's capital for the production of the instrument. Here, guitars continue to be handmade by skilled craftsmen and are renowned for their fine quality and precious woods.
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Albacete: Knives and Penknives

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, artisan knifes flourished in the region of Albacete. Originally, the knives were produced by Moorish craftsmen, with the techniques and traditions they employed still maintained today. A special knife museum in Albacete city celebrates the past and future of this local speciality.
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Tenerife: Handmade Lace

The 'Calado Canario' has been kept alive for generations, with knowledge of this art traditionally passed from mother to daughter. This is one of the most delicate and complex of handicrafts, with artisans working with materials such as linen and cotton, and creating patterns and intricate drawings on fabrics of all sizes.
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01 WHY SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA?\n

Why Santiago de Compostela?\n

As a cultural and university city and a meeting place for people from all over the world, Santiago de Compostela has become home to a variety of impressive contemporary architectural projects, including the Auditorium of Galicia, the Galician Contemporary Art center, and the City of Culture. Together with numerous parks, public spaces, fountains and sculptures, these make Compostela a city in which past and future – tradition and modernity – coexist in a unique way.
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World Heritage City

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Pilgrims Key Destination

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Lively Atmosphere

Santiago de Compostela was declared a World Heritage City by UNESCO in 1985. The declaration cited the city’s urban beauty and monumental integrity, as well as the profound echoes of its spiritual significance as an apostolic sanctuary and the destination of the Middle Ages' most important religious and cultural movement: the Way of St. James pilgrimage.

According to UNESCO, Santiago de Compostela is “beyond the shadow of a doubt one of the World Heritage’s most obvious properties,” and “an ideal city which is overflowing with history and timeless as well.” The Cathedral, its squares and medieval streets make up one of Europe’s most beautiful urban settings. In addition to UNESCO, Santiago has a long list of international prizes to its credit, including the UN Habitat Award for Good Practices and 2000 European City of Culture.

Pazo de Raxoi. Photo: Natursports / Shutterstock.com\n

In Santiago de Compostela, we discover a city tailor-made for the wayfarer. Centuries-old forests, dramatic beaches, and Finis Terrae (the End of the Earth) are all within easy reach. The landscape surrounding the city is dotted with Roman and medieval towns, remote monasteries, chapels along the pilgrimage route, Celtic settlements and quaint fishing villages.

Photo: Finis Terrae\n

There is always something to do in Compostela. 40,000 university students and countless visitors, bringing in youth and dynamic vitality, join the cosmopolitan city’s population of 100,000. A variety of cultural events, shops selling crafts, gold articles, silverware, and Galician fashion, traditional festivals, and vibrant nightlife make Santiago a lively destination all year round.

Cover photo: Pecold / Shutterstock.com
Photo: Turismo de Santiago\n

02 EL CAMINO DE SANTIAGO\n

El Camino de Santiago\n

The Way of St. James
Santiago de Compostela is the final destination of one of Europe’s most important pilgrimage routes, the Way of St. James. Since the discovery of the apostle’s tomb in 813 A.D., millions of pilgrims have crossed the continent to reach this Holy City in the ancient “finis terrae”. Today, this spiritual route is still a living tradition, although visitors can also arrive easily from numerous European and Latin American airports.

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Pilgrimage

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Holy Years

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Architecture

The pilgrimage to Santiago was among the most profoundly experienced religious phenomenon of the Middle Ages, a fact that was recognized by the European Parliament in designating the Way as the First European Cultural Itinerary, and by UNESCO, which declared it a World Heritage route.

Photo: Turismo de Santiago\n

The city was founded around the Romanesque Cathedral and grew to receive and cater hospitably to all its pilgrims. in 1122, during the diffusion of the Gregorian reforms, Pope Callistus instituted the tradition of declaring a Holy Year whenever the feast of St. James (July 25th) fell on a Sunday. In 1179, Pope Alexander III granted plenary indulgence to whoever made a pilgrimage during such a time: a visit to the apostolic tomb, which already sufficed to mobilize the faithful, was now rewarded with the promise of salvation.

Photo: Turismo de Santiago\n

One of the most significant monuments in Spanish medieval art, the city’s cathedral is surrounded by four squares: Platerías, Quintana, Azabachería and Obradoiro, the city’s hub, which could not have been set in a more splendid spot. Here we find the cathedral façade, the cloister and the Archbishop’s Palace; the five-star “Parador”, or state hotel, Hostal de los Reyes Católicos; the Palacio de Raxoi, now occupied by the City Hall; and the Colegio de San Jerónimo, which houses the university rectorate.\n

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Santiago today

In modern times, Santiago still cultivates its charm, rich heritage, and generosity to offer unforgettable experiences to all visitors. But there is still much more in store for the wayfarer: palaces, monasteries, churches and squares, always ready to receive visitors from anywhere and everywhere; and the comings and goings of thousands of students who attend the 500-year-old university. All are anxious to make the most of the city’s broad cultural spectrum.

Photo: Mirador de la Alameda\n

Organizing your event

03 ORGANIZING YOUR EVENT

The Santiago de Compostela Convention Bureau’s main objective is to promote the city as an ideal destination for conferences, conventions, incentives and events. It also provides comprehensive advice to tour operators, event organizers, professional associations and businesses, including connecting them with facilities specially designed for meetings and congresses and an extensive network of specialized businesses that offer all the professional services required by the MICE sector.
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Spaces

Venues and hotels

Santiago: the congress city

The Congress and Exhibition Hall of Galicia features innovative infrastructure designed for a variety of flexible uses. Its facilities – ranging from small rooms to two large auditoriums, a cafeteria and large open spaces – technical resources, and privileged location beside two large hotels at the end of the Way of St. James make it an unbeatable option for large-scale events.
The interior elements have been designed with austere elegance, using exclusively the natural colours of veined stone, metal, and wood.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Total cocktail capacity Exhibition area
26 5,660 2,100 1,500 3,000 4,250 m2




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Special Venues Santiago de Compostela

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Venues and hotels

The range of available accommodations includes both historic and modern buildings, all charming hotels with fantastic gastronomic offerings. There are also facilities specially designed for meetings and congresses, and an extensive network of specialised businesses that offer all the professional services required by the MICE sector.

Photo: Turismo de Santiago

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Multiusos Fontes do Sar

This spectacular structure in a city park near the River Sar is ideal for sporting events, concerts, fairs and exhibitions.
The huge space was treated as a singular piece in the middle of an extensive green space.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Total banquet capacity Total cocktail capacity Exhibition area
1 5065 3000 6000 1000 m2





Photo: Lares via Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA\n

The Cathedral

Santiago Cathedral, conceived as a small city of stone centered on holy relics and endowed with its own life, has evolved dynamically through the years. Today’s heterogeneous building displays a variety of historical styles and artistic tendencies that have been successively superimposed on one another. The cathedral is a balanced compendium of its original Romanesque style, as well as Gothic, Renaissance, baroque and neoclassical elements. It is surrounded by four squares: Platerías, Quintana, Azabachería, and the city’s hub: Obradoiro.
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Photo: joan_bautista / Shutterstock.com\n

Santiago City Market

The Mercado de Abastos of Santiago (Santiago City Market) is a place which appeals to all of the five senses, offering a wide range of fresh and traditional products. After the cathedral, this is the most visited spot in the city. Every Saturday sees more than 4,000 visitors, most being residents of Santiago and neighboring municipalities as well as hospitality professionals.
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Photo: Sergio TB / Shutterstock.com\n

Cidade da Cultura de Galicia

Galicia's City of Culture rises on Monte Gaiás like a new peak, its stony exterior mimicking archaeological sites as well as scallops, the symbol of Compostela. This magnificent cultural macro-structure was designed by New York’s architect Peter Eisenman and features towers by John Hejduk. In addition to exhibitions and cultural programs, it features spaces suitable for organizing small congresses, seminars, courses or presentations. Its exterior spaces offer an exceptional setting for numerous artistic activities.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Largest banquet capacity Total cocktail capacity Largest cocktail capacity
10 1,754 600 960 600 650 300





Photo: Turismo de Santiago\n

Santiago University venues

The University of Santiago de Compostela, with more than five centuries of history, is a renowned institution throughout Spain and Europe. Thanks to its rich heritage, it features ideal venues for all kinds of events. From emblematic and historic buildings such as the Colegio de Fonseca, the Colegio de San Xerome, and the Baroque church; to such contemporary constructions as the architect Álvaro Siza’s Media Studies Faculty and the Vista Alegre Complex designed by Arata Isozaki and César Portela.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity
9 1,700 320




Photo: Turismo de Santiago
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Auditorio de Galicia

This large complex, which includes two auditoriums and an exhibition hall, is made up of a series of stone volumes overlooking the pond in the Música en Compostela park. It offers fantastic views of historical buildings and is located mere steps from the city center. Auditorio de Galicia also offers visitors a top-rate music and exhibition program all year long.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Largest banquet capacity Largest cocktail capacity
11 1,200 300 1,020 220 260





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Hostal dos Reis Católicos *****

This former pilgrim hospital from the 15th century, now converted into a five-star “Parador” (state-run hotels in historical buildings) is Santiago de Compostela’s most emblematic hotel— and the oldest one in Europe. In its privileged location in the Plaza del Obradoiro, forming an angle with the Cathedral, it offers historic spaces, beautiful cloisters, a Renaissance chapel and elegant halls as well as two magnificent restaurants.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Largest banquet capacity Largest cocktail capacity
11 1,200 300 1,020 220 260





Photo & Cover photo: Paradores de Turismo\n

Hotel NH Collection Santiago de Compostela *****

The NH Obradoiro hotel offers modern luxury in a traditional setting. It is located in an extensive landscaped area facing the Auditorio de Galicia, a few minutes from the historic Plaza del Obradoiro in the center of the old town. Its meeting rooms feature versatile technical equipment suitable for any event.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Largest banquet capacity Largest cocktail capacity Parking
5 280 110 500 300 140 1






Photo: NH Hotel Group\n

Araguaney Gran Hotel *****

With a privileged location right in Santiago de Compostela’s business center, only a few meters from the monumental district, this welcoming establishment combines excellent gastronomy with modern rooms for meetings and banquets.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Largest banquet capacity Largest cocktail capacity Parking
12 645 300 500 300 300 1






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Hotel A Quinta da Auga ****

In an idyllic natural setting on the banks of the Sar River, close to the city of Santiago, this emblematic 18th-century building converted into a deluxe boutique hotel offers accommodation, spa and restaurant services. Private grounds covering more than a hectare and the relaxing sound of flowing water guarantee its guests rest in each of the 45 rooms, each of which has been carefully decorated with works of art, antiques and an exquisite French touch.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Largest banquet capacity Largest cocktail capacity Greenhouse (cocktails and presentations) Garden
2 460 300 408 208 300 1 1




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Hotel Monumento San Francisco ****

The Convent of San Francisco, located a few meters from Plaza del Obradoiro, dates from 1214 and now combines its religious function with that of a four-star hotel. Apart from its excellent location, it offers the serenity of a convent and excellent gastronomy. Its historic rooms, glazed courtyards and neoclassical church make any stay here an unforgettable experience.

 

Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Largest banquet capacity Largest cocktail capacity Cloister cocktail capacity Exhibition area
8 837 350 704 300 400 250 640 m2





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Monastery of San Martiño Pinario

In the Praza da Inmaculada, facing the Cathedral’s north façade, Pinario is the most important Baroque building in Galicia, and the second-largest monastery in Spain, after only El Escorial. With more than a thousand years of history, its spaces combine several functions: Seminary, museum of sacred art, guest quarters and meeting rooms.
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Meeting rooms Total meeting capacity Largest theater-style capacity Total banquet capacity Largest banquet capacity Largest cocktail capacity Cloister
7 500 250 450 300 300 1





Photo: Turismo de Santiago\n

04 INCENTIVES

Leisure activities for your event in Santiago de Compostela

Adventure and activity circuits for team building acquire special significance in the spectacular scenery of Galicia, the “land of a thousand rivers” and Spain’s most extensive coastline, combined with thousand-year-old forests and mythical mountains.  Perhaps your clients would enjoy a combined pilgrimage with spa experience, stopping to enjoy the thermal waters of Palas de Rei and Santiago de Compostela. Master the art of preparing Galician style octopus in a gastronomy workshop. Or experience the last 62 miles of the famous Way of St. James, with half-board, luggage transfer, and accommodations along the way.\n

Gastronomy workshop

Basic circuit

The Spa Way

Gastronomy in Santiago

The best of Galicia Tour

Gastronomy workshop

Galician style octopus

No one ever forgets Santiago’s fine cuisine. In its marketplace and more than a thousand restaurants, the city offers delicious, fresh and healthy Atlantic cuisine. Galician-style octopus, known as Polvo a feira, is one of the most famous dishes in traditional Galician cooking. During this workshop, you’ll learn to prepare an octopus from the moment it’s caught until the moment its plated, discovering how to achieve that perfect taste and consistency.
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Camino de Santiago basic circuit

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Camino de Santiago basic circuit

Follow the last 62 miles of the famous Way of St. James / Camino de Santiago pilgrimage route with half-board, luggage transfer and hostel accommodations. Since the Discovery of the apostle’s tomb hundreds of years ago, millions of pilgrims have crossed the continent to reach this Holy City in the ancient “finis terrae,” and this spiritual route is still a living tradition today.
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The Spa Way

Experience the Way of St. James in an alternative and comfortable style, combining 3 stages of the French Way with the relaxation offered by the thermal waters of Palas de Rei and Santiago de Compostela. This service includes accommodations and half-board in spa-hotels, spa treatments, a visit to Santiago’s old quarter and much more.
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Gastronomy in Santiago

Traditional Galician dishes include seafood, caldo gallego, shoulder of pork with turnip tops, octopus á feira, savoury pies, Padrón peppers, soft cheese, filloa, Santiago tart, and more. The perfect accompaniment is a Galician wine, including the whites and reds carrying a denomination of origin like Ribeiro or Rías Baixas. And any Galician celebration must end with a fiery queimada! This 3-day tour explores the land's culinary tradition and the quality of its ingredients from both sea and land, accompanied by a wide variety of local wines.
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The best of Galicia Tour

Adventure and activity circuits for team building acquire special significance in the spectacular scenery of Galicia, the “land of a thousand rivers” and Spain’s most extensive coastline, rich with thousand-year-old forests and mythical mountains. This tour will give you the chance to discover the magic world of Galicia by visiting some of its most emblematic and astonishing places. We will take you along to discover our way of life, landscapes, monuments, cuisine, culture and traditions.
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05 Transportation

Plan your trip to

Santiago

Flights

Trains

Roads & Port

Flights

Santiago de Compostela International Airport

Santiago de Compostela International Airport is the second-largest airport in northern Spain. Just six miles from the city center, with a central location within the region, it makes an ideal starting point for discovering northwestern Spain and northern Portugal.
There are daily flights between Santiago de Compostela and Madrid and Barcelona, as well as regular flights connecting with other Spanish cities such as Bilbao, Seville, Valencia, and Málaga and most major European cities, including London, Dublin, Paris, Zürich and Rome.

Airlines operating out of Santiago de Compostela Airport: IBERIA, Vueling, Aer Lingus, Swiss, Ryanair, Easyjet, and more. If you are flying to Spain from the US, the easiest way to reach Santiago is via Madrid or Barcelona.

Photo: Leo Hidalgo (@yompyz) via Foter.com / CC BY\n

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Trains

There are daily trains linking Santiago directly with Madrid, San Sebastián, Hendaye and Barcelona. With one change, there are also daily routes to Barcelona, Bilbao, Portugal and Paris as well as almost all the major destinations in Spain.
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Roads

A modern network of motorways (toll and free) lead to Santiago by road. There are coach services to destinations including Madrid, Barcelona, Seville and Bilbao. The bus station is conveniently located close to the historic center.\n

Port

Like all Mediterranean cities, Málaga has always been linked to the sea and the riches that come from it. Sheltered by a natural bay, the Port of Málaga has become the peninsula’s second most important cruise port.

Photo: © Área de Turismo. Ayuntamiento de Málaga\n

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Agenda

What’s happening in Spain in winter 2016/2017

06 AGENDA

Popular Festivals, Art, Sports.\n

Popular Festivals

Art

Sports

Sports

Popular Festivals

Song of the Sybil

December 24, 2016. Mallorca
The Song of the Sybil is a living example of medieval religious folklore that takes place in all the churches on the island of Mallorca on Christmas Eve. A special song sung by a young man only accompanied by an organ, the tradition has been awarded the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity designation.

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Popular Festivals

Easter Week

April 9 – 16, 2017. Andalusia
Easter week is one of the most heartfelt and deep-rooted of Spanish festivals. This commemoration has centuries of history and tradition, remembering the passion and death of Jesus Christ. The streets of the most of Spain's cities, towns and villages become the stage for religious fervor and devotion in memory of Christ's death. Music, art and color come together in magical processions—solemn parades in which crowds of people accompany religious images on their route through the streets. Some of the main cities in Andalusia are Malaga, Granada and Cordoba, whose historic center has been declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO.
Photo: Caron Badkin / Shutterstock.com

Granada
Málaga\n

Popular Fiestas

Fire Festivals for the Summer Solstice in the Pyrenees

June 20 – 29, 2016. Aragon and Catalonia
As part of an ancient ancestral tradition in different parts of Aragon and Catalonia, people celebrate the summer arrival with a variety of rituals centered on fire. UNESCO has declared these festivals to be an intangible cultural heritage, and they take place during the ephemeral and mystic midsummer solstice.\n

Popular Fiestas

The Battle of Wine

June 28 – 30, 2016. La Rioja
Every summer in the town of Haro in La Rioja, thousands of locals (and a handful of tourists) swarm the cliffs of Riscos de Bilibio for an enormous battle, bearing a most unusual weapon – wine. The streets flow with grape juice and the participants are dyed completely purple. Afterwards, everyone returns to the town for a festive lunch with all the typical products of the region – including, of course, the local wine.
Photo: Nebunel1 via Remodel Blog / CC BY\n

Popular Fiestas

Moors and Christians Fiesta

July 24 – 31, 2016. Valencia
The Moors and Christians festivals of Villajoyosa were declared to be of National Tourist Interest in 2003. These festivals are a great tourist attraction for all those interested in knowledge of Arabic and Christian culture: the celebration commemorates the Reconquest of Spain. For a full week of festivities, you can enjoy majestic parades by the opposing ‘armies’, gastronomic competitions, dances, fireworks and concerts at night. In the early hours of the 28th, the Moorish vessels land and the symbolic battle begins, with spectacular shows all day.\n

Popular Fiestas

San Fermín Fiestas

July 6 – 15, 2016. Navarre
The favorite attraction of Ernest Hemingway, the Running of the Bulls attracts thousands of people every year to experience the risk and excitement of the San Fermín fiestas. For this one week a year, the normally tranquil town of Pamplona gets overrun by a festive spirit that invades every street, resident and visitor.
In addition to the bulls, each morning features a parade of “giants and big-heads” to delight the little ones. The festive program also includes concerts, dance exhibitions, and open-air celebrations.
Photo: Migel / Shutterstock.com\n

Popular Fiestas

La Tomatina

August 31, 2016. Valencia
One of the world’s great food-fights, this unusual fiesta brings together crowds of people ready to experience the fun of throwing tomatoes at anything that moves. The Tomatina starts in the town square of Buñol, with pastries provided for breakfast by the city. At 11 o’clock, a shot announces the start of the fight and trucks loaded with tomatoes arrive one after another. When everything turns red, it is time to go to the river and try to get clean before the traditional lunch.
Photo: Ayuntamiento Buñol\n

Art

Clara Peeters - Women artists in the 17th century

Oct. 25, 2016 to Feb. 19, 2017
Museo del Prado, Madrid
Clara Peeters was a pioneer in the field of the still life and one of the few women artists in the early modern age to devote her activities to painting. She devoted her activities to still-life painting, deploying a style that emphasized the real appearance of things.

Cover photo: Mesa con mantel, salero, taza, aves asadas y aceitunas. Clara Peeters. 55 x 73 cm. 1611   
Photo: Bodegón con flores, copa de plata dorada, almendras, frutos secos, dulces, panecillos, vino y jarra de peltre. Clara Peeters. Óleo sobre tabla, 53 x 73 cm. 1611\n

Art

Picasso Portaits

March 17 to June 25, 2017. Picasso museum. Barcelona
The National Portrait Gallery and the Museu Picasso de Barcelona are organizing a major exhibition exploring the place of caricature in Picasso’s portraiture, a subject that has not previously been explored in detail. The exhibition will contain paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints from all periods of the artist’s long career. It is being curated by Elizabeth Cowling, Professor Emeritus of History of Art at Edinburgh University, and an independent scholar and exhibition curator.

Busto de mujer con sombrero. 9 junio de 1941. 92 x 60 cm. Musée national Picasso, Paris.MP188. Photo: ©RMN-Grand Palais (musée Picasso de Paris) / Jean-Gilles Berizzi. ©Sucesión Pablo Picasso, VEGAP, Madrid 2016\n

Art

Picasso Portaits

March 17 to June 25, 2017. Picasso museum. Barcelona
The National Portrait Gallery and the Museu Picasso de Barcelona are organizing a major exhibition exploring the place of caricature in Picasso’s portraiture, a subject that has not previously been explored in detail. The exhibition will contain paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints from all periods of the artist’s long career. It is being curated by Elizabeth Cowling, Professor Emeritus of History of Art at Edinburgh University, and an independent scholar and exhibition curator.

Photo: pio3 / Shutterstock.com\n

Music

FIB – Benicàssim International Festival

July 14 – 17, 2016. Castelló
Throughout its history, the Benicàssim International Festival has been a focal point for alternative pop/rock and electronic music lovers in Spain. The event also welcomes other forms of creative expression such as dance, theatre, sculpture and short film.
Photo: Christian Bertrand / Shutterstock.com\n

Sports

Jerez, World Motorcycling Capital

January– December 2017. Jerez de la Frontera
This city in southern Andalusia was chosen as the first World Motorcycling Capital from 2015 to 2017. Continuing its long tradition of Motorcycling and Suberbike world championships, Jerez will host the Spanish Motorcycle Grand Prix, the Superbike World Championship and many other events. If you are visiting the city, do not miss the “Motorcycle Walk of Fame” in honor of the stars of the sport, located on Álvaro Domecq Avenue.

Photo: David Acosta Allely / Shutterstock.com\n

Sports

Barcelona Marathon

March 12, 2017. Barcelona
Barcelona’s popular marathon passes some of the city's most emblematic monuments. Starting in Plaza de España square, the usual traffic landscape of Barcelona streets is replaced by thousands of runners passing the Sagrada Familia Church, La Pedrera Gaudi’s house and many other amazing locations.

Photo: CCat82 / Shutterstock.com\n

Art

Eye Games, Collection at Picasso Museum

March 14 – September 11, 2016. Málaga
Throughout his life, Picasso experimented with a variety of different artistic styles and techniques. For the first time, Málaga’s Museum is embracing all of them from a distinct angle: the viewer’s gaze.
Photo: © Museo Picasso Málaga\n

Sports

Jerez, World Motorcycling Capital

January– December 2017. Jerez de la Frontera
This city in southern Andalusia was chosen as the first World Motorcycling Capital from 2015 to 2017. Continuing its long tradition of Motorcycling and Suberbike world championships, Jerez will host the Spanish Motorcycle Grand Prix, the Superbike World Championship and many other events. If you are visiting the city, do not miss the “Motorcycle Walk of Fame” in honor of the stars of the sport, located on Álvaro Domecq Avenue.\n

Sports

Barcelona Marathon

March 12, 2017. Barcelona
Barcelona’s popular marathon passes some of the city's most emblematic monuments. Starting in Plaza de España square, the usual traffic landscape of Barcelona streets is replaced by thousands of runners passing the Sagrada Familia Church, La Pedrera Gaudi’s house and many other amazing locations.\n

Sports

Motorcycling: Jerez Circuit

January 1, 2015 – December 31, 2017. Jerez
The city of Jerez has a long tradition of excellence in motorsports. In the 60’s, the prestigious international race called “Trofeo de la Merced” was first organized, with motorbike legends like Angel Nieto, Ricardo Tormo and Marco Luchinelli participating. By the 80’s, the Circuito de Jerez had become one of Europe’s most important tracks, hosting the Formula One, Sport Prototypes and Motorcycles World Championships.
Photo: Rainer Herhaus / Shutterstock.com\n

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